A WORLD OF GOOD

sculpted-paint:

DEAR HEAD  FLOWERS  36X48 ACRYLIC SCULPTURE JUSTIN GAFFREY

sculpted-paint:

DEAR HEAD  FLOWERS  36X48 ACRYLIC SCULPTURE JUSTIN GAFFREY

NeSpoon - Jewellery of the Public Space

nowherelimited:

NeSpoon – Jewellery of the Public Space

NeSpoon is a street artist from Warsaw, Poland. Her artistic focus is on the intricate patterns of lace, and breaking its granny stereotype by using it to beautify gritty urban spaces. NeSpoon calls her artistic approach the “jewellery of the public space”:

Jewellery makes people look pretty, my public jewellery has the same goal, make public places look better.

NeSpoon often uses the…

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cross-connect:

Rebecca Louise Law born 1980 in Cambridge,UK is an installation artist who works with natural materials. She trained in Fine Art at Newcastle University, England. Her work plays with the relationship between the human being and nature. She is best known for her interactive large-scale installations of hanging flowers within site-specific spaces. As well as exhibiting in Public Spaces, Galleries and Museums, Rebecca has made installations for fashion brands such as; Hermes, Salvatore Ferragamo and Gucci.

For the wider community Rebecca has also led Land Art Projects to encourage social change through engaging with nature hands on. She operates out of a studio on Columbia Road, East London.

(via turecepcja)

whatthecool:

Broccoli House by artist and musician Brock Davis. The house is made out of broccoli, balsa wood, a craft knife and glue.
He says, “I couldn’t build a tree house for my son so I built him a broccoli house instead.”

whatthecool:

Broccoli House by artist and musician Brock Davis. The house is made out of broccoli, balsa wood, a craft knife and glue.

He says, “I couldn’t build a tree house for my son so I built him a broccoli house instead.”

moarrrmagazine:

Amazing Shadow sculptures by Tim Noble and Sue Webster 

From discarded wood, welded scrap metal, broken tools, cigarette packets, soda cans and piles of trash, Tim Noble and Sue Webster make assemblages and then point light to create projected shadows of people standing, sitting, smoking, drinking or anything easily recognizable. Every debris is precisely set in place, taking into consideration its distance from the wall, and its angle with the spotlight. The result is surprising and powerful as it redefines how abstract forms can transform into figurative ones.